The item has been
added to your basket.
Products
A Guide to Game Birds

Red Grouse

Overview:
The red grouse is a medium-sized game bird. It has a plump body, a short tail and a lightly hook-tipped bill. It is reddish-brown, with its legs and feet covered in pale feathers. Birds breed in the UK in the uplands of the north and west and are resident all year round, travelling very little in their lives. The population is declining, perhaps linked to diseases and the loss of heather moorland.
 
Where to see them:
The best place to see this bird is on upland heather moors, when is suddenly rockets up from the heather when disturbed to fly off with fast-whirring wingbeats.
 
When to see them:
All year round.
 
What they eat:
Heather, seeds, berries, insects

Pheasant

 Overview:
A large, long-tailed gamebird. Males have rich chestnut, golden-brown and black markings on body and tail, with a dark green head and red face wattling. Females are mottled with paler brown and black. They were introduced to the UK long ago and more recent introductions have brought in a variety of races and breeds for sport shooting.
 
Where to see them:
Across most of the UK, apart from the far north and west of Scotland. Least common in upland and urban. Usually seen in the open countryside near woodland edges, copses and hedgerows.
 
When to see them:
All year round.
 
What they eat:
Seeds, grain and shoots.

Red-Legged Partridge

Overview:
Larger than the grey partridge, it has a large white chin and throat patch, bordered with black. It has a greyish body with bold black flank stripes, and a chestnut-sided tail. It is an introduced species, brought to the UK from continental Europe, where it is largely found in France and Spain.
 
Where to see them:
Most numerous in England, especially in the east, with some birds in the Welsh borders and in eastern Scotland. Usually seen in groups in open fields.
 
 When to see them:
All year round.
 
What they eat:
Seeds and roots.

Grey partridge

Overview:
A medium-sized, plump gamebird with a distinctive orange face. Flies with whirring wings and occasional glides, showing a chestnut tail. It is strictly a ground bird, never likely to be found in pear trees! Groups of 6-15 (known as coveys) are most usually seen outside the breeding season. Once very common and widespread, it has undergone serious declines throughout most of its range and is a Red List species.
 
Where to see them:
They are traditionally found in lowland arable areas of Great Britain from the chalk areas in the south, into East Anglia, Lincolnshire and Nottinghamshire, reaching into the north of England and the East of Scotland as far as Aberdeenshire. There are small populations in other parts such as the permanent rushy pastures in the north Pennines. They are largely absent from N.Ireland.
 
When to see them:
All year round.
 
What they eat:
Leaves, seeds and insects.

Black Grouse

Overview:
The all-black males have distinctive red wattle over the eye and show a striking white stripe along each wing in flight. They have a lyre-shaped tail which is fanned out and raised to show white under-tail feathers when displaying. The smaller grey-brown females have a slightly notched tail. Habitat loss and overgrazing have resulted in severe population declines which make this a Red List species. Positive habitat management is helping them to increase in some areas.
 
Where to see them:
Found in upland areas of Wales, the Pennines and most of Scotland. Best looked for on farmland and moorland with nearby forestry or scattered trees. They have traditional 'lek' sites where the males display.
 
When to see them:
All year round.
 
What they eat:
Buds, shoots, catkins and berries.

 


No products available under this category

For leading brands at competitive prices, visit Tallis Country, the convenient country store.